Chuck Sweater

Have you ever knit something that just comes together perfectly that you want to scream from the top of a building, ” I did it! I have created the ultimate fitted sweater!”

Well my Chuck Sweater is this knitted object. Everything from the color to the final fit just came together to form a fantastic garment. Often when knitting sweaters something goes a little wonky, but not with Chuck. The pattern and charts were easy to follow, I enjoyed working with the yarn and seeing the pattern unfold in my lap.

I used Cascade 220 Superwash in Dark Periwinkle (discontinued). I love Cascade 220 for sweaters as it has nice stitch definition and is an affordable wool.

In the past, I have had fit issues with Andi Satterlund’s patterns. My sweaters have either come out too small or too large. Andi designs with a retro fit in mind which generally means negative ease. My body shape (short torso, muscular frame) often isn’t compatible with her designs as written. I generally make modifications and/or give my sweaters to others. Figuring out the right garment proportions for my body is something I continue to struggle with despite me having 16 years of knitting experience. However, I had great optimism for Chuck. The design works from the back shoulders and over the chest area before it is joined under the arms. This construction was great for me as I could try on the garment as I knit.

My final result? A sweater that I love and fits my body shape wonderfully! I really enjoyed the Chuck pattern as it had just enough difficulty (cabling on front panel only) that I felt challenged without feeling overworked. I had never tried a project with this open cable pattern so I was glad I expanded my horizons.

What handmade garment have you made that has resulted in an amazing fit?

Until Next Time,

-Whit-

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Jaywalker Socks: The Purple Edition

Hello! It is Friday (finally!) and I have a very pretty FO to show you. Meet my Purple Jaywalker Socks!

 A couple of summers ago I made these Green Jaywalker socks from Berroco Ultra Alpaca Fine. The yarn had great stitch definition, however, it was not very stretchy.

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Jaywalker Socks

This time around I used Cascade Heritage Paints in Mulled. I think I am a bigger fan of using a variegated yarn with this pattern over a solid color. Yes, there was some color pooling, but I really like how much more pronounced the zig zags look.


I followed the same format I did with the green socks (starting with the smallest size and increased one size up after the cuff). The intended recipient has wide feet so I wanted to make sure that the socks slipped over her feet with ease. This yarn also was much stretchier than the Berroco Ultra Fine Alpaca, so I don’t think there will be any fit problems.


The only other modification I made was that I skipped the textured heel flap. It was an editing thing. The yarn was competing too much with the texture. I like to keep things simple so I used a basic stockinette stitch.


My love for the Cascade Heritage line (Paints and Prints) has grown exponentially. The color saturation of the yarn is stunning, it is wonderful to work with, and the stitch definition is awesome!

Until Next Time,

-Whit-

FO: Red Rosina Sweater

Whew! She is done. Actually, she has been completed since mid-December, but I procrastinated on photographing her. The Rosina Pullover has been something in my Ravelry queue for quite a while. Originally, the lacework sleeves caught my eye. I loved how elegant and feminine they looked. I immediately clicked add to queue and there the pattern sat until 3 months ago.

I have to admit this sweater took a long while to make. Two and a half months to be exact.  The fingering weight yarn (Cascade 220 Fingering in Burgundy) and size US 2 needles made this project a slow burn. The stockinette section made for great TV/knitting group work, however, the lace portions required some significant concentration. There was many a time when some frogging action occurred. Looking back I should have worked a sleeve, then the body, and then the last sleeve. It would have given my mind a little break…and I also could have better binge watched Game of Thrones (haha).


Construction/ Pattern: The good thing about this pattern is all of the different sizing options. There are 10 different sizes one can choose from. As a knitter who hates math, this was perfect for me. I loved not having to rework the pattern calculations too much to ensure a proper fit. On the other hand, the number of sizing options made reading the pattern quite a challenge. I had to go through the whole pattern about 5 times and highlight the directions for my size to make sure I didn’t get off track. Once I got that worked out, the pattern was fairly easy to read.

Modifications: I did make some modifications to the original pattern. I skipped the lace section at the bottom and the flared sleeves and just replicated the neckline’s 1×1 ribbing. Both the flared sleeves and the lace bottom were a little too fussy for me.

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Fit: I was a little worried about the fit of this sweater. If you look at the pattern pictures the sweater is intended to fit on the snug side. I pretty consistently have issues with armholes. My shoulders and upper arms like to have lots of space so usually, I knit an extra 1/4 to 1/2 inches under the arm. This pattern was ideal for checking the fit as it is a top-down construction. I tried it on as a knit to make sure I had room to move.


Since finishing I have worn this sweater twice and people are amazed that I made it. To me, that is always a sign of a  handmade sweater that has hit the mark!

Until Next Time,

-Whit-

P.S. I decided to devote an Instagram account specifically to the blog :). Follow me at knitsbywhitsf