Knitted Baby Pants

In December, my family will head back to the USA to spend Christmas with my grandparents. This will be a 19 hour flight…during holiday time…with a 3 month old 😭. However, my grandparents are almost 90 and they really want to see the baby as she is the first great grandchild.

Since they live outside of Boston I am trying to knit up some winter clothing for all of us. Baby has about 5 sweaters so far. Yet, when I found Hosenmatz, I knew I had to use some of the gorgeous sock yarn I picked up this past summer in San Francisco.

I purchased Smooshy Petites in Cabaret from Firebird Yarns in San Francisco. This is a new yarn store to me since I moved away 2 years ago. The pants took almost 3 mini skeins. I love the variety of colors in this yarn and that it is oh so soft. As you can see the 3-6 month size is a bit baggy on her (she is only two months old), but I am sure she will grow into them in the next few months. I was left with a 1/3 of a skein of yarn, which will allow me to lengthen the pants as she grows.

I have to say I am a little jealous of these pants. They look perfect for lounging around in. Too bad I lack the ambition to embark on creating an adult sized version of them.

Until Next Time,

Chunky Knit Pullover

Grey is such a versatile color. You can pretty much wear it with any other color, which in my mind makes a grey sweater an essential wardrobe staple.

I purchased this yarn in Tokyo over a year ago. It sat in my stash in waiting for the day to be made into a sweater as I didn’t have large enough needles to make anything with it. This summer, I purchased some US Size 15 Knitter’s Pride Dreamz. These are my favorite needles! The colors are fun and the slip is perfect for my personal tension. They have an interchangeable set that I am resisting buying.

I used Natura Just Cotton XL yarn in Nuage and the pattern Sweet Lady Blue from Drops Designs. Since I only had 5 balls of yarn I modified the pattern. I shortened the body of the sweater as well as the sleeves. I knit the body (to under the armholes) to 12”. The sleeves were made from the cuff up to make sure I had enough yarn. To do this I worked out an even spacing pattern to increase the sleeves to 32 stitches. The other modification I made was skipping the crochet edge on the neckline.

I can’t wait to wear this sweater! I have many ideas about how to fit it in with the clothing I have. It is still unbelievably hot here so I have a few more months to wait.

Until Next Time,

-Whit-

The Vanessa Earwarmer

Test knitting is a great way to help designers create and publish patterns. It is integral to helping ensure that patterns are written clearly and correctly. I like to test knit ever so often as a way to learn more about the design process as well as earn access to the newest patterns. I mostly find test knitting projects via IG or Ravelry.

Such was the case for the Vanessa Earwarmers. Fiber and Fern (aka Brie Christine ) sent out a call via IG for test knitters for this interesting headband pattern. I like headbands as my ears are always cold in cooler weather and they can accommodate my voluminous hair.

I choose to use some remaining Cascade 220 Worsted to work up the pattern. Since this was a test knit the pattern was in progress so I made sure to contact the designer about the pattern directions when needed. The earwarmers took me about two days to create using worsted weight yarn and US Size 6 needles. The project was pretty gratifying. Not only did I get to try a new stitch pattern, but I used up some stash yarn AND got a Christmas gift completed. Talk about a triple score 😊.

I highly recommend the Vanessa Earmwarm pattern if you are looking for a headband pattern that incorporates a little bit more of a challenge than just stockinette stitch. They are quick to make and generate a trendy accessory for fall/winter.

Until Next Time,

-Whit-

Mosaic Water Hat

I love a good stitch dictionary. I swear by my Barbara Walker book (A Treasury of Knitting) for inspiration. Sadly, my book is still in the US as it isn’t an essential to living abroad. Lucky for me I stumbled upon this blog called String Geekery during a 3:00 AM feeding. It is awesome! The author posts lovely lace and mosaic charts for free!

Itching to start something new I decided to work up Naomi Parkhust’s water-inspired mosaic chart into a infant hat. Hats are a great canvas for work like this. You can get in just enough practice without having to commit to a huge project. Naomi only provided a chart so it was up to me to form a pattern around it. All was good when I started the hat, but as I got to the crown decreases I need to use my thinking cap. How could I preserve the colorwork pattern while decreasing?

I figured it out on the fly (aka just went for it) rather than charting it. To the average eye it looks fine, which was a-ok with me. After doing this I tried to write what I did down. However, I had trouble charting the decreases so that someone else would understand it. So I gave up. A bit fixed mindset I know, but I need some more education around making colorwork charts that include decreases.

Overall, I am happy with how the hat turned out. It was a good use of stash yarn and a great way for me to keep practicing my colorwork skills. I plan on trying more of Naomi’s mosaic charts in the near future. I am thinking I would like to use a green and grey color contrast.

Until Next Time,

Amigurumi Animal

I keep seeing all of these cute little crochet animals on IG and I wanted to try and make some. Now that I have a child (and know more people with children) I figured these darling animals would make great gifts for birthdays and the holiday season.

I am not a real cat fan, but this one was just irresistible. The pattern I followed was from https://paintitcolorful.blogspot.com and I used Rowan Handknit Cotton with a 3.5mm hook. The modification I made were adding the stripes to the body. I couldn’t quite judge if I would run out of yarn so I added them to give myself a little more yardage with the lilac color. I sewed eyes on the face and added a pink nose to up the cuteness factor. All in all this kitty is quite charming.

Until Next Time, 

Deux French Macaroon Sweaters

The French Macaroon Sweater is a really simple baby sweater. How simple? If you know how to cast on, knit, and bind off you will pretty much have yourself a sweater. French Macaroon is a boxy design that can really act as a base for a more advanced knitter to make endless modifications. For my first French Macaroon I kept pretty much to the pattern.

Instead of using two colors, I used three so that I could do a little stash busting. The yarn is Rowan Handknit Cotton and I really liked working with this yarn. It is super soft considering it is 100% cotton and comes in a variety of colors. Instead of making the sweater as two pieces, I worked in the round until the arm holes. At this point I put one side on a stitch holder and worked the sleeves for the front and back separately. By working the project this way I cut down on 2 seams! That saved about 20 minutes of working time.

With my second sweater, I used the pattern as a guide for the math. I worked with some StyleCraft yarn (sorry I lost the label) that was bulky weight so the gauge was completely different than my first sweater. My aim was to create a cropped sweater for a toddler. I used the math for the smallest sizing. The sweater seems a little wide when laid flat. However, it is a boxy design so I am sure it will not look as wide when worn. I had some yarn left over so I made a simple bow headband to match.

The French Macaroon Sweater is a great choice for a simple baby sweater mostly due to the endless design possibilities. I am not one who likes to do math so I enjoy using basic patterns such as this to act as a creative jumping point. I can certainly see some more French Macaroon Sweaters in my future.

Until Next Time,

Hoi An Top

In 2013, I went to Hoi An, Vietnam with my then boyfriend on a 8 week Southeast Asia backpacking trip. The town continues to be one of my favorite in Vietnam. The old section was a mix of history and beauty. The beach was such a relief in the oppressive heat. We rented bikes for $1 and had the time of our lives. One of my favorite memories was sitting at a local restaurant, while it rained, watching life go by with a “fresh beer” (beer from a keg) and a bowl of rose dumplings. Hoi An holds a very special place in my heart.

Biking around Hoi An

When I came across Hoi An Top I knew I had to make it. A beautiful lace tank that was inspired by the lanterns of Hoi An? Pattern sold ✅.

Sandra from Nomad Stitches made a well laid out pattern that included different colors for the different sizing options. My gauge was slightly different so I went with the large sizing. The lace chart is easy to work with and eventually I had it memorized. I repeated the chart four times as I wanted a shirt length top rather than cropped. The part of this pattern that dragged out for me was the I-cord bind off for the armholes and neckline. This is not my favorite bind-off method, but in this case I went with the designer’s judgement.

This was my first experience with Rosários 4 Alfama Eco Friendly 100% linen. The color of the yarn is such a lovely lilac. This yarn was easy to work with, but it did shed. I had to be careful about knitting prior to work so I didn’t end up a linty mess. Like any linen yarn there was a loss of fiber flexibility while knitting so I made sure to keep my weaving ends on the longer side. I used about 3 skeins for this project. Originally, I thought of making a tunic length so I overbought on yarn. Midway through the project I decided to keep it simple. I have several skeins leftover so I may make a mini version for the baby if I can get the math figured out.

The Hoi An Top was a rewarding garment to create. The construction was interesting and the lacework was right up my alley. Only order of business now is to find a nice occasion to wear it outside of the house.

Until Next Time,